Using Ducking For Electronic Dance Music

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Ducking is a term used (one that actually means what it sounds like!) to describe when one audio signal (say a voice) causes another audio signal (say some background music in a voice-over or narration) to get quieter at certain points, so that it ducks under the main audio (in this case, the voice).  This is especially useful for narrations where there is background music because though you want the music to be heard, you don't want it to drown out the voice.  So if you could somehow cause the music to get quieter at exactly the times when the voice is talking to sort of make the voice always be the main thing to be heard when both audios are audible, that would be handy.  And that is exactly what ducking is.  It uses a compressor (the effect usually used for turning down only the loudest bits of an audio signal while leaving the quiet bits alone) to make this happen.

Well as with most tools, ducking can be used for other things such as creating a pumping effect in electronic dance music.  The following article shows you how to do this using the audio software called Logic.  Check it out here.  There are even before and after audio samples.

http://audio.tutsplus.com/tutorials/production/quick-tip-silent-sidechaining-in-logic/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+audiotuts+%28Audiotuts%2B%29&utm_content=Google+Reader

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